Skin Care and Treatments of Melbourne Dermatology - pH Neutral (7.07) Ascorbic Acid Alone/Primarily Fails Skin

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pH Neutral (7.07) Ascorbic Acid Alone/Primarily Fails Skin

pH Neutral (7.07) Ascorbic Acid Alone/Primarily Fails Skin

Neutral ascorbic acid keeps skin's gears out of drive.


Ascorbic acid formulations (see example serums) which are pH neutral are not firming or substantially antioxidant as far as their ascorbic acid content is concerned because pH-neutral ascorbic acid has no biological activity — it's stable, but it's also comatose.

pH refers to (hydrogen) potential.

Neutral means there is none — that neutral ascorbic acid wishes to do nothing.

Refer the Topical L-Ascorbic Acid: Percutaneous Absorption Studies (Dermatol Surg. 2001;27:137-142) for notes on optimal pH as well as concentration and usage characteristics.

pH-neutral ascorbic acid formulations are probably popular because they don't yield side effects and will not oxidize even if stored for years, however neutral ascorbic acid provides no therapeutic potential for skin either.

pH-neutral ascorbic acid formulations are common in the beauty therapy and department store setting for precisely this reason, namely that the presence and idea of beneficial ascorbic acid is held to be sufficient and desirable even if all real-world usefulness for skin is absent.

Benefits of pH-neutral ascorbic acid formulations are derived from other ingredients included alongside Vitamin C, and typically only pertain to basic moisturization and false ideas about what is happening when they're used.

Ultimately, there is no substantial difference to skin whether you use ph-neutral ascorbic acid or Strivectin — any benefit is fleeting, superficial and psychologically purported.

Putting into personal practice beauty therapy and the deparment store's mandate of providing only notional care, individuals have attempted to make their own skin care products containing ascorbic acid.

Unsurprisingly they arrive at batches which are useless (neutral, alkaline or excessively adulterated) or harmful (too acidic) for skin.

You cannot reproduce therapeutically valid formulas in your kitchen, even with pH test strips as a tool — keep these for the swimming pool, its properties need not be so absolute for success.

If you must (by personal choice or technical requirement) use pH-neutral Vitamin C, use ascorbyl palmitate (as found in Jan Marini C-ESTA) or another engineered Vitamin C derivative.

These do not contain true, naturally-occurring Vitamin C so do not provide benefits for skin associated with ascorbic acid, however can be beneficial or more appropriate for other reasons.

For most individuals the benefits of topical ascorbic acid are a moot point anyway:

Refer mature skin analysis , Skinceuticals C E Ferulic Samples [Discussion] and skin care failure in general.

Related Skin Care Information, Products and Expert Discussions

Dr. Albert Laporte

Cosmetic Dermatology Newsletter Summer 2007

Jan Marini C-ESTA Serum vs. Skinceuticals C E Ferulic

Only Use One Brand

An Introduction to Skinceuticals


Ascorbic Acid :

Effects of Oxidized and Denatured Ascorbic Acid on Skin : pH Neutral (7.07) Ascorbic Acid Alone/Primarily Fails Skin : Ascorbic Acid vs. Ascorbyl Palmitate (2008) : Ascorbic Acid vs. Ascorbyl Palmitate — The Primary Antioxidant/Firming Quandry (2007) : Combining Use of Ascorbic Acid with Mineral-Rich Skin Care :


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